Monthly Archives: September 2019

about court reporting

Fun Facts About Court Reporting

Fun Facts About Court Reporting

This blog is about fun facts about court reporting. When you think of court reporting, the last thing you associate it with is fun, right?  Well, we would like to turn those thoughts around and brighten up court reporting with a few fun facts you probably didn’t know.

  1. Scribes were present with our Nation’s Founding Fathers as The Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights were drafted. Also,  President Lincoln entrusted scribes to record the Emancipation Proclamation.
  2. The ampersand (&) is one of the earliest examples of shorthand.
  3. Capturing the record of important proceedings dates back to the Fourth Century B.C.
  4. Charles Dickens began his career as a court reporter at the age of 16. It was during his four-year career as a court reporter and law clerk that he first learned shorthand. Michelle Pfeiffer also studied to be a court reporter just before the roles that made her famous.
  5. Annual salaries of captioners and court reporters can reach up to (or even exceed) $80,000.
  6. According to an industry outlook study, there is currently a demand for more than 5,500 court reporters and captioners.
  7. There are a few different types of court reporters. There are the court reporters that work in a courtroom all day and actually work for the court system; then there are freelance court reporters who mainly focus on depositions for attorneys in civil litigation.

If you are looking for court reporters that are the right fit for your needs, I invite you to schedule a deposition today. We have been serving attorneys and law firms in Phoenix, AZ for over 30 years. Come see the difference that we make in Phoenix court reporting.

attorney preparing witnesses depositions

Attorney Tips for Preparing Witnesses for Depositions

At Phoenix Deposition Services, we’re proud to provide several certified court reporting services that are highly beneficial to both attorneys and clients alike. From our video conferencing and deposition services to real-time court reporting and several related areas, we ensure you have access to quality deposition content as quickly as possible so you can move forward with your case.

Whether you’re an experienced attorney with years on the job or a newer entry to the field, managing a witness for a deposition is a tricky but vital area to consider. Let’s look at a few basic tips we can offer on properly preparing and managing a witness, including several areas that will maintain your own legal integrity and will ensure you’ve checked all the proper boxes.

Pre-Deposition Practice

For starters, it’s important to understand that the vast majority of people you might call as a deposition witness have no experience with the procedures associated with this or any part of a courtroom. Most people simply haven’t been in these situations before, so they might be nervous or somewhat intimidated by what’s facing them.

For this reason, it’s important to adequately prepare them in advance. It’s vital for us to make a major distinction here: As an attorney, you cannot actively coach the witness on what to say or how to respond to certain questions favorably. However, you can absolutely provide examples of the sorts of questions they might receive, detail the procedures that will take place, and explain why the deposition is important and how it may impact the case. You can also give general tips on deposition etiquette and other areas not directly related to the case in question.

Reviewing Court Rules

Another important area to go over with your witness is any rules or regulations present in the courtroom. Let them know about the kinds of motions or objections you might make as an attorney, plus inform them of any conferencing rules that are present for the deposition.

This conferencing area is important – witnesses must know the procedure for private conferences if they wish to speak with you during the deposition. In addition, they should be made aware that these kinds of conferences, if allowed (they might not be in some situations), might lead to general distrust or related issues with their testimony. If at all possible, encourage witnesses not to engage in a private conference unless absolutely necessary.

Clients and False Statements

In a rare situation where your witness makes an untrue statement that you know is false, the law is clear: It requires you to “remonstrate with the client confidentially, advise them of the lawyer’s duty of candor to the tribunal and seek the client’s cooperation with respect to the withdrawal or correction of the false statements or evidence.”

In other words: If your witness lies and you know it, you are legally required to start a private conference with them and advise them to recant their statement. For this reason, it’s also very important to inform your witness in advance about the vital nature of being truthful and honest throughout the deposition.

For more on preparing and managing a deposition witness, or to learn about any of our court reporters or video depositions, speak to the staff at Phoenix Deposition Services today.